Stephanie A. Smith

WARPAINT is a lyrical, emotionally charged novel about three American women painters (Liz Moore, C.C. Dyer and Quiola Kerr) at a crucial juncture: C.C. is diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and must fight for her life. As the eldest and most successful of the three painters, Liz Moore, C.C.’s teacher and a long-time Dyer family friend, feels helpless in the face of disease; by turns furious and determined, C.C. and, as she faces her illness, must come to terms with what she sees as her failure, having always lived in Liz Moore’s shadow. Quiola Kerr, C.C.'s ex-lover and part Ojibwa Indian, has been living in self-exile in Paris when C.C. is diagnosed, and returns to the States to help her ex cope, as well as to confront the familial demons that made her leave the U.S. in the first place. All three come together for a Liz Moore retrospective at MOMA in April 2002, just before C.C.'s radical mastectomy, radiation and chemotherapy, a course of treatment which will eventuate in C.C. making a radical choice about her life and career, a choice that will have far-reaching and unforeseen consequences.

Selected Works

fiction
WARPAINT is a lyrical, emotionally charged novel about three American women painters (Liz Moore, C.C. Dyer and Quiola Kerr) at a crucial juncture: C.C. is diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and must fight for her life. All three come together for a Liz Moore retrospective at MOMA in April 2002, just before C.C.'s radical mastectomy, radiation and chemotherapy, a course of treatment which will eventuate in C.C. making a choice about her life and career, a choice that will have far-reaching and unforeseen consequences.
Fiction
In the 21st century, humankind stands on the brink of extinction. The combined forces of environmental decay and debilitating diseases have brought civilization to a standstill. In a small Oregon community, however, a few survivors struggle to come to terms with the strange mutations that have transformed their children into the only hope for a viable future.
Essays
Household Words chronicles the endurance of American common sense through the language of politics.

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WAR-PAINT

WARPAINT is a lyrical, emotionally charged novel about three American women painters (Liz Moore, C.C. Dyer and Quiola Kerr) at a crucial juncture: C.C. is diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and must fight for her life. As the eldest and most successful of the three painters, Liz Moore, C.C.’s teacher and a long-time Dyer family friend, feels helpless in the face of disease; by turns furious and determined, C.C. and, as she faces her illness, must come to terms with what she sees as her failure, having always lived in Liz Moore’s shadow. Quiola Kerr, C.C.'s ex-lover and part Ojibwa Indian, has been living in self-exile in Paris when C.C. is diagnosed, and returns to the States to help her ex cope, as well as to confront the familial demons that made her leave the U.S. in the first place. All three come together for a Liz Moore retrospective at MOMA in April 2002, just before C.C.'s radical mastectomy, radiation and chemotherapy, a course of treatment which will eventuate in C.C. making a radical choice about her life and career, a choice that will have far-reaching and unforeseen consequences.


WARPAINT is a lyrical, emotionally charged novel about three American women painters (Liz Moore, C.C. Dyer and Quiola Kerr) at a crucial juncture: C.C. is diagnosed with late-stage breast cancer and must fight for her life. As the eldest and most successful of the three painters, Liz Moore, C.C.’s teacher and a long-time Dyer family friend, feels helpless in the face of disease; by turns furious and determined, C.C. and, as she faces her illness, must come to terms with what she sees as her failure, having always lived in Liz Moore’s shadow. Quiola Kerr, C.C.'s ex-lover and part Ojibwa Indian, has been living in self-exile in Paris when C.C. is diagnosed, and returns to the States to help her ex cope, as well as to confront the familial demons that made her leave the U.S. in the first place. All three come together for a Liz Moore retrospective at MOMA in April 2002, just before C.C.'s radical mastectomy, radiation and chemotherapy, a course of treatment which will eventuate in C.C. making a radical choice about her life and career, a choice that will have far-reaching and unforeseen consequences.